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And now for a visual update from the Market Photo Workshop (MPW) contingent of @TUSouthAfrica! Four Temple students (Kelsey Dubinsky, Rebekah Flake, Meaghan Pogue and Ian Watson) have the blessing and challenge of working with local students in the Photojournalism and Documentary Program of MPW to explore and document Johannesburg to create original and informative photo essays in just four weeks. Throughout this immersion experience we have connected with our South African peers to build meaningful professional and personal relationships, heard from top photojournalists, viewed documentary photography exhibitions and traversed the four corners of Johannesburg (and beyond!) in search of the best images for our stories. Here is a tiny peak into our world: 

 
Top: Leon Sadiki has braved conflict zones as a photojournalist. He came to the Market Photo Workshop auditorium to present his work to us last week. Specifically, he presented work produced amidst a South African troops presence in the Democratic Republic of the Congo as well as the tension and eventual violence unfolding during last year’s deadly standoff between miners and police in Marikana. It was inspiring to hear about how his passion for photography gave him the courage to work in those charged locations. Still, he made sure to emphasize multiple times that his life is worth more than a picture and a conflict photographer has to be willing to walk away if the scene becomes too dangerous. 
Row 2: (left) Market Photo Workshop hosts a gallery space to showcase cutting edge photography projects. MPW exhibitions coordinator Bafana Zembe led a tour through the current show entitled “Sidetracks.” The works came from the personal photographic archives of a white South African family combined with images by photographers focusing on black, colored and Indian populations. A narrative of common humanity yet stark racial divides emerges through the juxtaposition of photographs and the unique curatorial design of the exhibition. 
(right) The young photojournalists in the MPW Photojournalism and Documentary Program (PDP) head out into the field to create their own visual records of news, current events and social conditions across greater Johannesburg. Here PDP student Ofentse Ramaboa interviews recycling collectors in their informal settlement on the outskirts of Soweto as she works on a photographic character essay on one of the men.
Row 3: On Monday we went to The Times newsroom in the Rosebank suburb of northern Johannesburg to meet with award winning sports photographer and photojournalist Sydney Seshibedi (second from right). He was eager to introduce us to the newspaper’s photo-editing staff to discuss the process of shooting on assignment as well as how images make it into a layout and/or circulate globally. Afterwards he took us out for coffee to discuss his career on a more personal level. The most powerful message for me was when he expounded on the discomfort in photographing people of various socio-economic strata. He pointed out that the homeless are an easy target because they have nowhere to go to avoid the photographer’s lens, whereas the wealthy have many mechanisms to protect their privacy. Most photographers fall somewhere between the extremes in terms of their personal social status, so they have to work hard to seek balance and get a variety of subjects for their work, even if it means confronting those intimidating barriers of the elite. He also taught us the value of writing descriptive captions so that the photographs are archived in a useful and accurate manner. Also pictured L-R: PDP Coordinator Kagiso Monyatsi, Temple photojournalism students Ian Watson and Meaghan Pogue, and PDP student Kabelo Emmanuel.
Row 4: (left) Temple student Rebekah Flake poses (as best she can!) with students on their recess break at Julius Sebolai Primary School in Braamfisher, Soweto. On this Nelson Mandela International Day, the Johannesburg Development Agency (JDA) sent out workers to perform their 67 minutes of service by painting and cleaning classroom buildings at the school. Three PDP students and two Temple students photographed at this school, while the other students from both Market Photo Workshop and Temple Journalism documented and volunteered at other locations across the city (see previous TUSouthAfrica Tumblr posts for more information).
(right) Temple student Ian Watson walks with PDP student Ofentse Ramaboa at the Orlando Station in Soweto. The exchange is producing working partnerships and new friendships for all!
Row 5: (left) PDP student Tumelo Ledingwane (right) receives a scarf as thanks from one of her documentary subjects, a blind musician who works on the sidewalks of Johannesburg’s Central Business District. The gift is a testimony to the rich relationships journalists can sometimes develop across the community as they research stories and engage with the public. 
(right) Bheki, a PDP student, takes us off road in Soweto to find that perfect shot!
Row 6: Being at the Workshop gives Temple students a chance to mingle with a wide variety of emerging South African photographers and photojournalists. Here Tommy, student from Madagascar (left), receives critique of his work during an MWP Advanced Program class. In addition to the Photojournalism and Documentary Program, the Workshop provides introductory, intermediate and advanced instruction in the technical and creative aspects of photography. The halls are always bustling with photographers of many levels, ages and interests. 
Row 7: Finally, the exchange has produced some great times and big smiles! Temple students frequently break off in small groups as our PDP colleagues offer guidance with our individual photography projects. In this example Anna Kamolane lights up as she explains the urban nightlife as we grab drinks downtown at the trendy Kitchener’s bar in Braamfontein while I document the shifting architectural and social topography of contemporary Johannesburg.
By Rebekah Flake
Zoom Info
And now for a visual update from the Market Photo Workshop (MPW) contingent of @TUSouthAfrica! Four Temple students (Kelsey Dubinsky, Rebekah Flake, Meaghan Pogue and Ian Watson) have the blessing and challenge of working with local students in the Photojournalism and Documentary Program of MPW to explore and document Johannesburg to create original and informative photo essays in just four weeks. Throughout this immersion experience we have connected with our South African peers to build meaningful professional and personal relationships, heard from top photojournalists, viewed documentary photography exhibitions and traversed the four corners of Johannesburg (and beyond!) in search of the best images for our stories. Here is a tiny peak into our world: 

 
Top: Leon Sadiki has braved conflict zones as a photojournalist. He came to the Market Photo Workshop auditorium to present his work to us last week. Specifically, he presented work produced amidst a South African troops presence in the Democratic Republic of the Congo as well as the tension and eventual violence unfolding during last year’s deadly standoff between miners and police in Marikana. It was inspiring to hear about how his passion for photography gave him the courage to work in those charged locations. Still, he made sure to emphasize multiple times that his life is worth more than a picture and a conflict photographer has to be willing to walk away if the scene becomes too dangerous. 
Row 2: (left) Market Photo Workshop hosts a gallery space to showcase cutting edge photography projects. MPW exhibitions coordinator Bafana Zembe led a tour through the current show entitled “Sidetracks.” The works came from the personal photographic archives of a white South African family combined with images by photographers focusing on black, colored and Indian populations. A narrative of common humanity yet stark racial divides emerges through the juxtaposition of photographs and the unique curatorial design of the exhibition. 
(right) The young photojournalists in the MPW Photojournalism and Documentary Program (PDP) head out into the field to create their own visual records of news, current events and social conditions across greater Johannesburg. Here PDP student Ofentse Ramaboa interviews recycling collectors in their informal settlement on the outskirts of Soweto as she works on a photographic character essay on one of the men.
Row 3: On Monday we went to The Times newsroom in the Rosebank suburb of northern Johannesburg to meet with award winning sports photographer and photojournalist Sydney Seshibedi (second from right). He was eager to introduce us to the newspaper’s photo-editing staff to discuss the process of shooting on assignment as well as how images make it into a layout and/or circulate globally. Afterwards he took us out for coffee to discuss his career on a more personal level. The most powerful message for me was when he expounded on the discomfort in photographing people of various socio-economic strata. He pointed out that the homeless are an easy target because they have nowhere to go to avoid the photographer’s lens, whereas the wealthy have many mechanisms to protect their privacy. Most photographers fall somewhere between the extremes in terms of their personal social status, so they have to work hard to seek balance and get a variety of subjects for their work, even if it means confronting those intimidating barriers of the elite. He also taught us the value of writing descriptive captions so that the photographs are archived in a useful and accurate manner. Also pictured L-R: PDP Coordinator Kagiso Monyatsi, Temple photojournalism students Ian Watson and Meaghan Pogue, and PDP student Kabelo Emmanuel.
Row 4: (left) Temple student Rebekah Flake poses (as best she can!) with students on their recess break at Julius Sebolai Primary School in Braamfisher, Soweto. On this Nelson Mandela International Day, the Johannesburg Development Agency (JDA) sent out workers to perform their 67 minutes of service by painting and cleaning classroom buildings at the school. Three PDP students and two Temple students photographed at this school, while the other students from both Market Photo Workshop and Temple Journalism documented and volunteered at other locations across the city (see previous TUSouthAfrica Tumblr posts for more information).
(right) Temple student Ian Watson walks with PDP student Ofentse Ramaboa at the Orlando Station in Soweto. The exchange is producing working partnerships and new friendships for all!
Row 5: (left) PDP student Tumelo Ledingwane (right) receives a scarf as thanks from one of her documentary subjects, a blind musician who works on the sidewalks of Johannesburg’s Central Business District. The gift is a testimony to the rich relationships journalists can sometimes develop across the community as they research stories and engage with the public. 
(right) Bheki, a PDP student, takes us off road in Soweto to find that perfect shot!
Row 6: Being at the Workshop gives Temple students a chance to mingle with a wide variety of emerging South African photographers and photojournalists. Here Tommy, student from Madagascar (left), receives critique of his work during an MWP Advanced Program class. In addition to the Photojournalism and Documentary Program, the Workshop provides introductory, intermediate and advanced instruction in the technical and creative aspects of photography. The halls are always bustling with photographers of many levels, ages and interests. 
Row 7: Finally, the exchange has produced some great times and big smiles! Temple students frequently break off in small groups as our PDP colleagues offer guidance with our individual photography projects. In this example Anna Kamolane lights up as she explains the urban nightlife as we grab drinks downtown at the trendy Kitchener’s bar in Braamfontein while I document the shifting architectural and social topography of contemporary Johannesburg.
By Rebekah Flake
Zoom Info
And now for a visual update from the Market Photo Workshop (MPW) contingent of @TUSouthAfrica! Four Temple students (Kelsey Dubinsky, Rebekah Flake, Meaghan Pogue and Ian Watson) have the blessing and challenge of working with local students in the Photojournalism and Documentary Program of MPW to explore and document Johannesburg to create original and informative photo essays in just four weeks. Throughout this immersion experience we have connected with our South African peers to build meaningful professional and personal relationships, heard from top photojournalists, viewed documentary photography exhibitions and traversed the four corners of Johannesburg (and beyond!) in search of the best images for our stories. Here is a tiny peak into our world: 

 
Top: Leon Sadiki has braved conflict zones as a photojournalist. He came to the Market Photo Workshop auditorium to present his work to us last week. Specifically, he presented work produced amidst a South African troops presence in the Democratic Republic of the Congo as well as the tension and eventual violence unfolding during last year’s deadly standoff between miners and police in Marikana. It was inspiring to hear about how his passion for photography gave him the courage to work in those charged locations. Still, he made sure to emphasize multiple times that his life is worth more than a picture and a conflict photographer has to be willing to walk away if the scene becomes too dangerous. 
Row 2: (left) Market Photo Workshop hosts a gallery space to showcase cutting edge photography projects. MPW exhibitions coordinator Bafana Zembe led a tour through the current show entitled “Sidetracks.” The works came from the personal photographic archives of a white South African family combined with images by photographers focusing on black, colored and Indian populations. A narrative of common humanity yet stark racial divides emerges through the juxtaposition of photographs and the unique curatorial design of the exhibition. 
(right) The young photojournalists in the MPW Photojournalism and Documentary Program (PDP) head out into the field to create their own visual records of news, current events and social conditions across greater Johannesburg. Here PDP student Ofentse Ramaboa interviews recycling collectors in their informal settlement on the outskirts of Soweto as she works on a photographic character essay on one of the men.
Row 3: On Monday we went to The Times newsroom in the Rosebank suburb of northern Johannesburg to meet with award winning sports photographer and photojournalist Sydney Seshibedi (second from right). He was eager to introduce us to the newspaper’s photo-editing staff to discuss the process of shooting on assignment as well as how images make it into a layout and/or circulate globally. Afterwards he took us out for coffee to discuss his career on a more personal level. The most powerful message for me was when he expounded on the discomfort in photographing people of various socio-economic strata. He pointed out that the homeless are an easy target because they have nowhere to go to avoid the photographer’s lens, whereas the wealthy have many mechanisms to protect their privacy. Most photographers fall somewhere between the extremes in terms of their personal social status, so they have to work hard to seek balance and get a variety of subjects for their work, even if it means confronting those intimidating barriers of the elite. He also taught us the value of writing descriptive captions so that the photographs are archived in a useful and accurate manner. Also pictured L-R: PDP Coordinator Kagiso Monyatsi, Temple photojournalism students Ian Watson and Meaghan Pogue, and PDP student Kabelo Emmanuel.
Row 4: (left) Temple student Rebekah Flake poses (as best she can!) with students on their recess break at Julius Sebolai Primary School in Braamfisher, Soweto. On this Nelson Mandela International Day, the Johannesburg Development Agency (JDA) sent out workers to perform their 67 minutes of service by painting and cleaning classroom buildings at the school. Three PDP students and two Temple students photographed at this school, while the other students from both Market Photo Workshop and Temple Journalism documented and volunteered at other locations across the city (see previous TUSouthAfrica Tumblr posts for more information).
(right) Temple student Ian Watson walks with PDP student Ofentse Ramaboa at the Orlando Station in Soweto. The exchange is producing working partnerships and new friendships for all!
Row 5: (left) PDP student Tumelo Ledingwane (right) receives a scarf as thanks from one of her documentary subjects, a blind musician who works on the sidewalks of Johannesburg’s Central Business District. The gift is a testimony to the rich relationships journalists can sometimes develop across the community as they research stories and engage with the public. 
(right) Bheki, a PDP student, takes us off road in Soweto to find that perfect shot!
Row 6: Being at the Workshop gives Temple students a chance to mingle with a wide variety of emerging South African photographers and photojournalists. Here Tommy, student from Madagascar (left), receives critique of his work during an MWP Advanced Program class. In addition to the Photojournalism and Documentary Program, the Workshop provides introductory, intermediate and advanced instruction in the technical and creative aspects of photography. The halls are always bustling with photographers of many levels, ages and interests. 
Row 7: Finally, the exchange has produced some great times and big smiles! Temple students frequently break off in small groups as our PDP colleagues offer guidance with our individual photography projects. In this example Anna Kamolane lights up as she explains the urban nightlife as we grab drinks downtown at the trendy Kitchener’s bar in Braamfontein while I document the shifting architectural and social topography of contemporary Johannesburg.
By Rebekah Flake
Zoom Info
And now for a visual update from the Market Photo Workshop (MPW) contingent of @TUSouthAfrica! Four Temple students (Kelsey Dubinsky, Rebekah Flake, Meaghan Pogue and Ian Watson) have the blessing and challenge of working with local students in the Photojournalism and Documentary Program of MPW to explore and document Johannesburg to create original and informative photo essays in just four weeks. Throughout this immersion experience we have connected with our South African peers to build meaningful professional and personal relationships, heard from top photojournalists, viewed documentary photography exhibitions and traversed the four corners of Johannesburg (and beyond!) in search of the best images for our stories. Here is a tiny peak into our world: 

 
Top: Leon Sadiki has braved conflict zones as a photojournalist. He came to the Market Photo Workshop auditorium to present his work to us last week. Specifically, he presented work produced amidst a South African troops presence in the Democratic Republic of the Congo as well as the tension and eventual violence unfolding during last year’s deadly standoff between miners and police in Marikana. It was inspiring to hear about how his passion for photography gave him the courage to work in those charged locations. Still, he made sure to emphasize multiple times that his life is worth more than a picture and a conflict photographer has to be willing to walk away if the scene becomes too dangerous. 
Row 2: (left) Market Photo Workshop hosts a gallery space to showcase cutting edge photography projects. MPW exhibitions coordinator Bafana Zembe led a tour through the current show entitled “Sidetracks.” The works came from the personal photographic archives of a white South African family combined with images by photographers focusing on black, colored and Indian populations. A narrative of common humanity yet stark racial divides emerges through the juxtaposition of photographs and the unique curatorial design of the exhibition. 
(right) The young photojournalists in the MPW Photojournalism and Documentary Program (PDP) head out into the field to create their own visual records of news, current events and social conditions across greater Johannesburg. Here PDP student Ofentse Ramaboa interviews recycling collectors in their informal settlement on the outskirts of Soweto as she works on a photographic character essay on one of the men.
Row 3: On Monday we went to The Times newsroom in the Rosebank suburb of northern Johannesburg to meet with award winning sports photographer and photojournalist Sydney Seshibedi (second from right). He was eager to introduce us to the newspaper’s photo-editing staff to discuss the process of shooting on assignment as well as how images make it into a layout and/or circulate globally. Afterwards he took us out for coffee to discuss his career on a more personal level. The most powerful message for me was when he expounded on the discomfort in photographing people of various socio-economic strata. He pointed out that the homeless are an easy target because they have nowhere to go to avoid the photographer’s lens, whereas the wealthy have many mechanisms to protect their privacy. Most photographers fall somewhere between the extremes in terms of their personal social status, so they have to work hard to seek balance and get a variety of subjects for their work, even if it means confronting those intimidating barriers of the elite. He also taught us the value of writing descriptive captions so that the photographs are archived in a useful and accurate manner. Also pictured L-R: PDP Coordinator Kagiso Monyatsi, Temple photojournalism students Ian Watson and Meaghan Pogue, and PDP student Kabelo Emmanuel.
Row 4: (left) Temple student Rebekah Flake poses (as best she can!) with students on their recess break at Julius Sebolai Primary School in Braamfisher, Soweto. On this Nelson Mandela International Day, the Johannesburg Development Agency (JDA) sent out workers to perform their 67 minutes of service by painting and cleaning classroom buildings at the school. Three PDP students and two Temple students photographed at this school, while the other students from both Market Photo Workshop and Temple Journalism documented and volunteered at other locations across the city (see previous TUSouthAfrica Tumblr posts for more information).
(right) Temple student Ian Watson walks with PDP student Ofentse Ramaboa at the Orlando Station in Soweto. The exchange is producing working partnerships and new friendships for all!
Row 5: (left) PDP student Tumelo Ledingwane (right) receives a scarf as thanks from one of her documentary subjects, a blind musician who works on the sidewalks of Johannesburg’s Central Business District. The gift is a testimony to the rich relationships journalists can sometimes develop across the community as they research stories and engage with the public. 
(right) Bheki, a PDP student, takes us off road in Soweto to find that perfect shot!
Row 6: Being at the Workshop gives Temple students a chance to mingle with a wide variety of emerging South African photographers and photojournalists. Here Tommy, student from Madagascar (left), receives critique of his work during an MWP Advanced Program class. In addition to the Photojournalism and Documentary Program, the Workshop provides introductory, intermediate and advanced instruction in the technical and creative aspects of photography. The halls are always bustling with photographers of many levels, ages and interests. 
Row 7: Finally, the exchange has produced some great times and big smiles! Temple students frequently break off in small groups as our PDP colleagues offer guidance with our individual photography projects. In this example Anna Kamolane lights up as she explains the urban nightlife as we grab drinks downtown at the trendy Kitchener’s bar in Braamfontein while I document the shifting architectural and social topography of contemporary Johannesburg.
By Rebekah Flake
Zoom Info

And now for a visual update from the Market Photo Workshop (MPW) contingent of @TUSouthAfrica! Four Temple students (Kelsey Dubinsky, Rebekah Flake, Meaghan Pogue and Ian Watson) have the blessing and challenge of working with local students in the Photojournalism and Documentary Program of MPW to explore and document Johannesburg to create original and informative photo essays in just four weeks. Throughout this immersion experience we have connected with our South African peers to build meaningful professional and personal relationships, heard from top photojournalists, viewed documentary photography exhibitions and traversed the four corners of Johannesburg (and beyond!) in search of the best images for our stories. Here is a tiny peak into our world: 

Top: Leon Sadiki has braved conflict zones as a photojournalist. He came to the Market Photo Workshop auditorium to present his work to us last week. Specifically, he presented work produced amidst a South African troops presence in the Democratic Republic of the Congo as well as the tension and eventual violence unfolding during last year’s deadly standoff between miners and police in Marikana. It was inspiring to hear about how his passion for photography gave him the courage to work in those charged locations. Still, he made sure to emphasize multiple times that his life is worth more than a picture and a conflict photographer has to be willing to walk away if the scene becomes too dangerous. 

Row 2: (left) Market Photo Workshop hosts a gallery space to showcase cutting edge photography projects. MPW exhibitions coordinator Bafana Zembe led a tour through the current show entitled “Sidetracks.” The works came from the personal photographic archives of a white South African family combined with images by photographers focusing on black, colored and Indian populations. A narrative of common humanity yet stark racial divides emerges through the juxtaposition of photographs and the unique curatorial design of the exhibition.

(right) The young photojournalists in the MPW Photojournalism and Documentary Program (PDP) head out into the field to create their own visual records of news, current events and social conditions across greater Johannesburg. Here PDP student Ofentse Ramaboa interviews recycling collectors in their informal settlement on the outskirts of Soweto as she works on a photographic character essay on one of the men.

Row 3: On Monday we went to The Times newsroom in the Rosebank suburb of northern Johannesburg to meet with award winning sports photographer and photojournalist Sydney Seshibedi (second from right). He was eager to introduce us to the newspaper’s photo-editing staff to discuss the process of shooting on assignment as well as how images make it into a layout and/or circulate globally. Afterwards he took us out for coffee to discuss his career on a more personal level. The most powerful message for me was when he expounded on the discomfort in photographing people of various socio-economic strata. He pointed out that the homeless are an easy target because they have nowhere to go to avoid the photographer’s lens, whereas the wealthy have many mechanisms to protect their privacy. Most photographers fall somewhere between the extremes in terms of their personal social status, so they have to work hard to seek balance and get a variety of subjects for their work, even if it means confronting those intimidating barriers of the elite. He also taught us the value of writing descriptive captions so that the photographs are archived in a useful and accurate manner. Also pictured L-R: PDP Coordinator Kagiso Monyatsi, Temple photojournalism students Ian Watson and Meaghan Pogue, and PDP student Kabelo Emmanuel.

Row 4: (left) Temple student Rebekah Flake poses (as best she can!) with students on their recess break at Julius Sebolai Primary School in Braamfisher, Soweto. On this Nelson Mandela International Day, the Johannesburg Development Agency (JDA) sent out workers to perform their 67 minutes of service by painting and cleaning classroom buildings at the school. Three PDP students and two Temple students photographed at this school, while the other students from both Market Photo Workshop and Temple Journalism documented and volunteered at other locations across the city (see previous TUSouthAfrica Tumblr posts for more information).

(right) Temple student Ian Watson walks with PDP student Ofentse Ramaboa at the Orlando Station in Soweto. The exchange is producing working partnerships and new friendships for all!

Row 5: (left) PDP student Tumelo Ledingwane (right) receives a scarf as thanks from one of her documentary subjects, a blind musician who works on the sidewalks of Johannesburg’s Central Business District. The gift is a testimony to the rich relationships journalists can sometimes develop across the community as they research stories and engage with the public. 

(right) Bheki, a PDP student, takes us off road in Soweto to find that perfect shot!

Row 6: Being at the Workshop gives Temple students a chance to mingle with a wide variety of emerging South African photographers and photojournalists. Here Tommy, student from Madagascar (left), receives critique of his work during an MWP Advanced Program class. In addition to the Photojournalism and Documentary Program, the Workshop provides introductory, intermediate and advanced instruction in the technical and creative aspects of photography. The halls are always bustling with photographers of many levels, ages and interests. 

Row 7: Finally, the exchange has produced some great times and big smiles! Temple students frequently break off in small groups as our PDP colleagues offer guidance with our individual photography projects. In this example Anna Kamolane lights up as she explains the urban nightlife as we grab drinks downtown at the trendy Kitchener’s bar in Braamfontein while I document the shifting architectural and social topography of contemporary Johannesburg.

By Rebekah Flake

Yesterday,
We visited the extraordinary Apartheid museum. This museum impeccably exemplified the History of South Africa, which exhibited the country before, during, and after apartheid. The museum walked us through each and every stage of the struggles and victories of this country. It was quite an experience and truly an eye opener to the fall and rise of of a South Africa.

Yesterday,
We visited the South African Broadcast Corporation (SABC), which is a state-owned broadcasting corporation that offers 18 different radio stations, as well as four television broadcasts. With the launch of SABC taking place on August 1st, 1937, this broadcast corporation recently celebrated it’s 77th anniversary.

SABC broadcasts 2 types of radio stations. The first type of radio station is a public radio station. The radio stations that are public cover all news in the indigenous languages of South Africa. The second type of radio station is commercial radio, which mainly plays songs and is often for mere entertainment. Ukhozi, which is in the indigenous language Zulu, is the biggest radio station in South Africa. It is also one of the biggest radio stations in the world, coming in at 2nd place just after a radio station based in China.

As I mentioned earlier, SABC also has four television broadcasts. The first, SABC 1, targets the youth, and is also a public service channel. The second channel, SABC 2, is a family channel that was created for all ages. SABC 3 is a commercial radio station which is only for adults, mostly urban adults. Lastly, SABC News, which was just launched on August 1st, is their brand new 24 hour broadcasts news channel.

The pictures above are just a preview of our tour throughout the SABC Buildings!

South African Institute of Race Relations

Today,

We visited The South African Institute of Race Relations, an institution that has been in existence since the 1920’s. This institution incorporates an objective voice in which facts are presented to support a wide range of topics. These topics often deal with socio-economic issues, which include: health, education, business, the economy, employment, politics, and much more. The Institute of Race Relations allows people to see the world from different angles through extensive research that is presented in their annual publications. There is also a monthly publication, entitled Fast Facts, which presents research on a specific subject each month. The South African Institute of Race Relations aims to make information accessible and easy to understand.

For more information about the South African Institute of Race Relations, visit their website by clicking on the link above!

This weekend, several of the study abroad students visited the Pilanesberg National Park, a game reserve located close to Johannesburg and Pretoria. This national park, which is home to the BIG 5, is the fourth largest park in South Africa, approximately 150 thousand acres wide. It is also the location of a 1300 million year old inactive volcano crater. Although for the duration of our visit we did not see all of the BIG 5, we were able to encounter Zebras, Rhinos, Hippos, Wilder Beasts,  Elephants, Impalas, and even more. The landscape was beautiful beyond words. It was amazing to witness the animals in their natural habitats and living amongst one another in harmony. There is no better feeling than being one with nature, even though we sat in a van the entire time…haha. But none the less, it was Quite an Experience!
Photo Cred: Kayla Oatneal
Zoom Info
This weekend, several of the study abroad students visited the Pilanesberg National Park, a game reserve located close to Johannesburg and Pretoria. This national park, which is home to the BIG 5, is the fourth largest park in South Africa, approximately 150 thousand acres wide. It is also the location of a 1300 million year old inactive volcano crater. Although for the duration of our visit we did not see all of the BIG 5, we were able to encounter Zebras, Rhinos, Hippos, Wilder Beasts,  Elephants, Impalas, and even more. The landscape was beautiful beyond words. It was amazing to witness the animals in their natural habitats and living amongst one another in harmony. There is no better feeling than being one with nature, even though we sat in a van the entire time…haha. But none the less, it was Quite an Experience!
Photo Cred: Kayla Oatneal
Zoom Info
This weekend, several of the study abroad students visited the Pilanesberg National Park, a game reserve located close to Johannesburg and Pretoria. This national park, which is home to the BIG 5, is the fourth largest park in South Africa, approximately 150 thousand acres wide. It is also the location of a 1300 million year old inactive volcano crater. Although for the duration of our visit we did not see all of the BIG 5, we were able to encounter Zebras, Rhinos, Hippos, Wilder Beasts,  Elephants, Impalas, and even more. The landscape was beautiful beyond words. It was amazing to witness the animals in their natural habitats and living amongst one another in harmony. There is no better feeling than being one with nature, even though we sat in a van the entire time…haha. But none the less, it was Quite an Experience!
Photo Cred: Kayla Oatneal
Zoom Info

This weekend, several of the study abroad students visited the Pilanesberg National Park, a game reserve located close to Johannesburg and Pretoria. This national park, which is home to the BIG 5, is the fourth largest park in South Africa, approximately 150 thousand acres wide. It is also the location of a 1300 million year old inactive volcano crater. Although for the duration of our visit we did not see all of the BIG 5, we were able to encounter Zebras, Rhinos, Hippos, Wilder Beasts,  Elephants, Impalas, and even more. The landscape was beautiful beyond words. It was amazing to witness the animals in their natural habitats and living amongst one another in harmony. There is no better feeling than being one with nature, even though we sat in a van the entire time…haha. But none the less, it was Quite an Experience!

Photo Cred: Kayla Oatneal

kdubinsky:

So I spent this last weekend in Durban, and let me tell you, I have done a lot of things in my life, but I think it was one of the most memorable experience I have ever had. We left out of Rocky Bay and took a raft/boat out into some pretty rough waves. On our way out we saw a whale breaching, a pod of about 70 dauphins and a flying fish! Then we finally got out as far as we needed to go, they threw the cage into the ocean and attracted the sharks by throwing in bait and hitting the water to cause vibrations. Before we knew it two Black Tip sharks had surfaced and they told me to jump in the cage. Let me tell you, I did not like being the first person in. Three of us  stayed under for about ten minutes and then we switched with the other three. On our second turn in the cage, we stayed down a bit longer, and there was about 10 sharks, including Black Tip and Dusky sharks. It was incredible to see the sharks up close and personal, but at some points I felt like the sharks were a bit too curious. Oh, and the theme of the boat ride was definitely sea sickness for 4 out of 6 of us, if you know what I mean.
TIA (This is Africa),
Kelsey
Zoom Info
kdubinsky:

So I spent this last weekend in Durban, and let me tell you, I have done a lot of things in my life, but I think it was one of the most memorable experience I have ever had. We left out of Rocky Bay and took a raft/boat out into some pretty rough waves. On our way out we saw a whale breaching, a pod of about 70 dauphins and a flying fish! Then we finally got out as far as we needed to go, they threw the cage into the ocean and attracted the sharks by throwing in bait and hitting the water to cause vibrations. Before we knew it two Black Tip sharks had surfaced and they told me to jump in the cage. Let me tell you, I did not like being the first person in. Three of us  stayed under for about ten minutes and then we switched with the other three. On our second turn in the cage, we stayed down a bit longer, and there was about 10 sharks, including Black Tip and Dusky sharks. It was incredible to see the sharks up close and personal, but at some points I felt like the sharks were a bit too curious. Oh, and the theme of the boat ride was definitely sea sickness for 4 out of 6 of us, if you know what I mean.
TIA (This is Africa),
Kelsey
Zoom Info
kdubinsky:

So I spent this last weekend in Durban, and let me tell you, I have done a lot of things in my life, but I think it was one of the most memorable experience I have ever had. We left out of Rocky Bay and took a raft/boat out into some pretty rough waves. On our way out we saw a whale breaching, a pod of about 70 dauphins and a flying fish! Then we finally got out as far as we needed to go, they threw the cage into the ocean and attracted the sharks by throwing in bait and hitting the water to cause vibrations. Before we knew it two Black Tip sharks had surfaced and they told me to jump in the cage. Let me tell you, I did not like being the first person in. Three of us  stayed under for about ten minutes and then we switched with the other three. On our second turn in the cage, we stayed down a bit longer, and there was about 10 sharks, including Black Tip and Dusky sharks. It was incredible to see the sharks up close and personal, but at some points I felt like the sharks were a bit too curious. Oh, and the theme of the boat ride was definitely sea sickness for 4 out of 6 of us, if you know what I mean.
TIA (This is Africa),
Kelsey
Zoom Info
kdubinsky:

So I spent this last weekend in Durban, and let me tell you, I have done a lot of things in my life, but I think it was one of the most memorable experience I have ever had. We left out of Rocky Bay and took a raft/boat out into some pretty rough waves. On our way out we saw a whale breaching, a pod of about 70 dauphins and a flying fish! Then we finally got out as far as we needed to go, they threw the cage into the ocean and attracted the sharks by throwing in bait and hitting the water to cause vibrations. Before we knew it two Black Tip sharks had surfaced and they told me to jump in the cage. Let me tell you, I did not like being the first person in. Three of us  stayed under for about ten minutes and then we switched with the other three. On our second turn in the cage, we stayed down a bit longer, and there was about 10 sharks, including Black Tip and Dusky sharks. It was incredible to see the sharks up close and personal, but at some points I felt like the sharks were a bit too curious. Oh, and the theme of the boat ride was definitely sea sickness for 4 out of 6 of us, if you know what I mean.
TIA (This is Africa),
Kelsey
Zoom Info
kdubinsky:

So I spent this last weekend in Durban, and let me tell you, I have done a lot of things in my life, but I think it was one of the most memorable experience I have ever had. We left out of Rocky Bay and took a raft/boat out into some pretty rough waves. On our way out we saw a whale breaching, a pod of about 70 dauphins and a flying fish! Then we finally got out as far as we needed to go, they threw the cage into the ocean and attracted the sharks by throwing in bait and hitting the water to cause vibrations. Before we knew it two Black Tip sharks had surfaced and they told me to jump in the cage. Let me tell you, I did not like being the first person in. Three of us  stayed under for about ten minutes and then we switched with the other three. On our second turn in the cage, we stayed down a bit longer, and there was about 10 sharks, including Black Tip and Dusky sharks. It was incredible to see the sharks up close and personal, but at some points I felt like the sharks were a bit too curious. Oh, and the theme of the boat ride was definitely sea sickness for 4 out of 6 of us, if you know what I mean.
TIA (This is Africa),
Kelsey
Zoom Info

kdubinsky:

So I spent this last weekend in Durban, and let me tell you, I have done a lot of things in my life, but I think it was one of the most memorable experience I have ever had. We left out of Rocky Bay and took a raft/boat out into some pretty rough waves. On our way out we saw a whale breaching, a pod of about 70 dauphins and a flying fish! Then we finally got out as far as we needed to go, they threw the cage into the ocean and attracted the sharks by throwing in bait and hitting the water to cause vibrations. Before we knew it two Black Tip sharks had surfaced and they told me to jump in the cage. Let me tell you, I did not like being the first person in. Three of us  stayed under for about ten minutes and then we switched with the other three. On our second turn in the cage, we stayed down a bit longer, and there was about 10 sharks, including Black Tip and Dusky sharks. It was incredible to see the sharks up close and personal, but at some points I felt like the sharks were a bit too curious. Oh, and the theme of the boat ride was definitely sea sickness for 4 out of 6 of us, if you know what I mean.

TIA (This is Africa),

Kelsey

kdubinsky:

    I have finally decided, a little more than a week into this adventure, what exactly I want to photograph while I am here.
    What I want to show everyone when I come back home is that South Africa isn’t all that you see in commercials for starving children, the poverty, and the lions and zebras. I want to show everyone what I have experienced first hand. What is that you ask? I have been seeing great things in these low income townships.  There is so many people doing things to pursue their life dreams, and better themselves and their communities. 
    Just to show you a little piece into my story that I will be coming home with, without giving much information yet, above are images of a boy who came from the streets and found himself a place to live, work, and enjoy himself all in one place. 

#TUSouthAfrica #PhiladelphiaNeighborhoods
Zoom Info
kdubinsky:

    I have finally decided, a little more than a week into this adventure, what exactly I want to photograph while I am here.
    What I want to show everyone when I come back home is that South Africa isn’t all that you see in commercials for starving children, the poverty, and the lions and zebras. I want to show everyone what I have experienced first hand. What is that you ask? I have been seeing great things in these low income townships.  There is so many people doing things to pursue their life dreams, and better themselves and their communities. 
    Just to show you a little piece into my story that I will be coming home with, without giving much information yet, above are images of a boy who came from the streets and found himself a place to live, work, and enjoy himself all in one place. 

#TUSouthAfrica #PhiladelphiaNeighborhoods
Zoom Info
kdubinsky:

    I have finally decided, a little more than a week into this adventure, what exactly I want to photograph while I am here.
    What I want to show everyone when I come back home is that South Africa isn’t all that you see in commercials for starving children, the poverty, and the lions and zebras. I want to show everyone what I have experienced first hand. What is that you ask? I have been seeing great things in these low income townships.  There is so many people doing things to pursue their life dreams, and better themselves and their communities. 
    Just to show you a little piece into my story that I will be coming home with, without giving much information yet, above are images of a boy who came from the streets and found himself a place to live, work, and enjoy himself all in one place. 

#TUSouthAfrica #PhiladelphiaNeighborhoods
Zoom Info
kdubinsky:

    I have finally decided, a little more than a week into this adventure, what exactly I want to photograph while I am here.
    What I want to show everyone when I come back home is that South Africa isn’t all that you see in commercials for starving children, the poverty, and the lions and zebras. I want to show everyone what I have experienced first hand. What is that you ask? I have been seeing great things in these low income townships.  There is so many people doing things to pursue their life dreams, and better themselves and their communities. 
    Just to show you a little piece into my story that I will be coming home with, without giving much information yet, above are images of a boy who came from the streets and found himself a place to live, work, and enjoy himself all in one place. 

#TUSouthAfrica #PhiladelphiaNeighborhoods
Zoom Info

kdubinsky:

    I have finally decided, a little more than a week into this adventure, what exactly I want to photograph while I am here.

    What I want to show everyone when I come back home is that South Africa isn’t all that you see in commercials for starving children, the poverty, and the lions and zebras. I want to show everyone what I have experienced first hand. What is that you ask? I have been seeing great things in these low income townships.  There is so many people doing things to pursue their life dreams, and better themselves and their communities. 

    Just to show you a little piece into my story that I will be coming home with, without giving much information yet, above are images of a boy who came from the streets and found himself a place to live, work, and enjoy himself all in one place. 

#TUSouthAfrica #PhiladelphiaNeighborhoods

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